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The Gift of Pain Relief

Therapy Laser Treatments for Dogs & Cats

This winter season, if your pet is suffering from. . .

  • Chronic or Post-Surgery Pain
  • Pain from a Recent Injury
  • Limited Mobility due to Aging or Arthritis

. . . then this could be one of the best gifts he or she ever receives.

Finally, there’s a way to safely and affordably relieve your pet of pain, allowing him or her to live a happier, more active life.

Used in the NFL, the NBA, MLB, the NHL, FIFA and even in the Olympics, athletes and trainers swear by it. It’s a safe alternative to drugs and surgery, and there are no known side effects.

Introducing. . . Cold Laser Therapy

First recognized for its beneficial effects almost 40 years ago, there have been thousands of studies documenting the positive effects of low-power laser light on different types of cells, tissues, and disorders. Completely safe, the laser light simply promotes better blood flow and stimulates the production of ATP deep in the tissue of treated areas.

Just watch this video to see how it works. . .

 

 

Cold Laser Therapy has been successful in treating pain and many acute and chronic conditions, such as. . .

  • Arthritis
  • Degenerative Joint Disease
  • Tendonitis
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Sprains, Strains & Fractures
  • Post-Surgical Healing / Pain Relief
  • Tooth Extraction Pain Relief
  • Periodontal Disease
  • Inflammations
  • Allergies
  • Infections
  • Cuts/ Bites
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Lick Granulomas
  • Geriatric Care
  • Feline Acne

Treatments & Fees

As with any medical or therapeutic procedure, treatment plans are prescribed based on your pet’s specific condition. Therefore, the number and length of treatments varies from case to case. Usually, several treatments are required for maximum efficacy.

Naturally, new and innovative medical technology can be expensive. And you might expect that an advanced procedure like Cold Laser Therapy could cost hundreds – if not thousands – of dollars over the course of multiple treatments.

But even at that price, wouldn’t it be worth it to see your pet healthier, happier, and more active?

Fortunately, Cold Laser Therapy has become very economical. (Please call for current pricing.) PLUS, you can now get $30 toward your first package of 6 sessions with the following certificate. . .

Holiday Laser Therapy Promotion

(Click Image For Printable Certificate)

Give Your Pet The Relief They Deserve! Schedule Today: 717-766-5535

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5 Quick Tips to Protecting Your Pet from Fleas & Ticks this Summer & Fall + Great Offers on Preventatives

Summertime can be a blast for pets, but it can also be a very dangerous time of year. While your pets are outdoors, they can easily come into contact with ticks that may be carrying life-threatening diseases.

Most commonly, ticks are known to transmit. . .

  • Lyme Disease
  • Babesiosis (a malaria-like parasitic disease)
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (a serious and potentially life-threatening infectious disease)
  • Ehrlichiosis (a bacterial disease that varies in severity, but can lead to death in some cases)

It’s also important to understand that as we transition into cooler fall months, fleas are just as active as they are during the summer months. Naturally, your pet’s fur is an ideal retreat from cool temperatures. And while they don’t present the same level of danger that ticks do, fleas can make your pet feel miserable.

Through the rest of the summer and into the fall, you can help keep your pet safe and healthy with these five easy tips. . .

  • Make your yard less appealing to ticks by cutting grass short and eliminating brush piles.
  • Vacuum frequently in your home, especially carpets where your pet tends to lounge.
  • Cover up all outside crawl spaces and garbage cans to deter wildlife that may carry fleas and ticks.
  • Examine your pet’s fur after they’ve been outside, as you may find ticks before they’ve had a chance to attach themselves.
  • Use preventative medications like Frontline Plus, Revolution, or NexGard to kill ticks, as well as fleas.

Questions? We invite you to call us at 717-766-5535. Together, we can help keep your pet happy and healthy throughout a long life.

Help protect your pet from parasites with these popular preventatives. . .

NexGard

NEW!!!
$50 Rebate

NexGard Chewables
Oral Flea & Tick Prevention
in a Beefy Chew for Dogs Only

• Get a $50 mail-in rebate when you purchase 6 doses of NexGard AND 12 doses of Heartgard together.

 
Sentinel-spectrum-wormer-(for-large-dogs)-6Tb

NEW!!!
$15 – $35 REBATE

on Sentinel Spectrum

For Prevention of Heartworms, Hookworms, Whipworms, Roundworms, Tapeworms, and Fleas

• Get a $35 REBATE when you buy 12 Doses

OR

• Get a $15 REBATE when you buy 6 Doses

 
frontline home-sect2-img-d

FREE Doses
of Frontline Plus

Flea & Tick Prevention
for Dogs & Cats

• Get 2 Free Doses when you buy 6

OR

• Get 1 Free Dose when you buy 3

 
preventatives promo heartgard plus

$50 REBATE
on Heartgard Plus (and NexGard)

Heartworm, Hookworm, and Roundworm Prevention
for Dogs

• Get a $50 mail-in rebate when you purchase 12 doses of Heartgard Plus
AND 6 doses of NexGard together

OR

• Get a $12 REBATE when you buy
12 Doses of Heargard Plus

 
RevolutionCat-6-pack

FREE Doses
of Revolution

Flea, Tick & Heartworm Prevention
for Cats & Dogs

• Get 3 Free Doses when you buy 9

OR

• Get 2 Free Doses when you buy 6

 

Call Now to Order: 717-766-5535
or
CLICK HERE to Order Online

*Offers good while available.

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Ask the Doctor: How Do I Keep My Pets Safe During The Holidays?

Written by Dr. Robert Heidecker

Question: With the holiday season upon us, what should I know or be watchful for to keep my pets safe?

Answer: There are many types of holiday hazards that pet owners need to be aware of and on the lookout for that can be poisonous or detrimental your pet’s health. **It is very important to contact our office or your veterinarian should your pet ingest any of the listed items below. (When in doubt, a call will never hurt).

 
Plants

1. Holly & Mistletoe – Both are highly poisonous to dogs and cats, and any ingestion should be reported to your veterinarian immediately.
2. Poinsettia – Mainly just causes vomiting and diarrhea in both dogs and cats.
3. Pine needles – There are 2 concerns. First, the needles are sharp and can damage the throat or intestines of your pet. Second, the sap is very irritating to your pet’s digestive tract.

 
Foods

1. Poultry bones such as turkey or chicken bones – These bones are sharp and can splinter causing damage of the esophagus or intestinal tract including punctures or perforations. It is very important to avoid giving your pet the opportunity to ingest these bones from trash or your kitchen counters or tables.
2. Chocolate – The most dangerous or toxic chocolate to your pet’s health is dark or baker’s chocolate. Even milk chocolate, if enough is ingested, can cause toxicity.
3. Fatty foods – Vets see numerous cases every year of very sick pets due to eating human foods that they should not be eating. Fatty foods can cause vomiting and diarrhea and in some instances pancreatitis, which can be life threatening.
4. Year round toxic foods – As ALWAYS, avoid your pet ingesting macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, onions, and xylitol-containing candies/gum/food products.

 
Christmas Hazards

1. Ornaments – Avoid your pet ingesting tinsel, ribbon, or glass or sharp ornaments or decorations.
2. Candles – Candles are a fire hazard and your pet does not know that. Candles can get knocked over by wagging tails or curious cats investigating and catching their hair or tails on fire. A good recommendation is to use flameless candles or at least place lit candles in a safe location where your pets cannot get to them.
3. Electrical cords – Keep cords out of pet’s reach as the most common thing we see at our office is pet’s getting electrocuted or their mouths burned from chewing on the cords.
4. Christmas Tree – Make sure to secure your tree or anchor it well as pets are curious and frequently knock them over hurting themselves or damaging your house or decorations.
5. Christmas Tree Water – Do not allow your pets to drink the tree water. This could make your pet very sick due to the needles and sap that gets into the water.

 

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Your Pet and the Hazards of the Holidays

Written by Dr. Nina Mantione

Turkey dinners, sparkly trees, pine scented candles and beribboned packages are all the wonderful things we look forward to during the holiday season. And who doesn’t love to spoil their cats and dogs? Certainly there should be new fluffy beds and yummy treats just for them too. While the holiday season gives us a reason to spoil our four legged family members, it can also hold some hidden health risks you should be watchful for.

 
Holiday Meals

It is hard to resist the soulful brown eyes of your dog or the sweet little meow of your cat when they beg for a taste of the big feast, but feeding them from the table this time of year may end up making them sick. Rich fatty foods can lead to a bout of vomiting and diarrhea that we refer to as a gastroenteritis, and in some cases, eating a high fat meal can lead to pancreatitis, a sometimes life threatening inflammation of the pancreas. We should also be cautious about what foods we give our pets. Certain ingredients, like onions, chocolate, or raisins, can be toxic to our pets. If you really can’t resist a special treat from the table, a tiny piece of turkey with no sauce or skin is a good option to share.

 
Decorations

There may be nothing more tempting to a cat or young dog than holiday decorations! All of those twinkly lights and holly berries look like such fun to play with, and the Christmas tree offers a fun fort to hide under and climb. Aside from wrecking your expensive decorations, ingesting foreign objects is a quick way to land your pet in our office. In a worst case scenario, an object could lodge itself in the intestine, a condition we call a foreign body obstruction. Typically (but not always) an obstructed animal will vomit profusely and lose their appetite. Diagnosed via our physical exam and x-rays, an obstruction is a life threatening emergency. We recommend only supervised access to these holiday temptations and discourage any use of tinsel, which is especially appealing to cats.

Decorative candles and menorahs can pose another holiday hazard when curious cats or boisterous dogs are around. We’ve seen plenty of singed whiskers on our feline friends and more than one puppy who has gotten too close to the hot wax or open flame. Make sure candles are kept high enough to avoid being knocked over by a happy tail, and never leave them unattended when your cats are exploring.

 
Holiday Travel

If you plan to travel with your pet over the holidays, make sure he or she is up to date on all vaccines, particularly if you plan to cross state lines. You may want to bring your pet’s vaccine records just in case of emergency, as well as any extra doses of medications your pet may be on. If your pet has a chronic or serious health condition, you should bring along a copy of his or her medical records in the event you need to make an emergency visit to an out of town veterinarian. Make sure your pet has identification in the form of an ID tag and/or microchip. If your pet is wearing a tag, make sure it has a number where you can be reached while you are away (such as a cell phone).

Have a very safe and happy holiday! Spoil your furry friends (but not too much!), and don’t forget to put a stocking by the chimney for them too.

 

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How To Relieve Your Pet’s Pain. . .

. . . With The Same Medical Technology Used by Professional Athletes

If your pet is suffering from chronic or post-surgery pain, pain from a recent injury, or discomfort or limited mobility due to aging or arthritis, then you must read this important announcement.

Finally, there’s a procedure that can help to safely and affordably relieve your pet of pain, allowing him or her to live a happier, more active life.

Used in the NFL, the NBA, MLB, the NHL, FIFA and even in the Olympics, athletes and trainers swear by it. It’s a safe alternative to drugs and surgery, and there are no known side effects.

Scientifically proven, it’s been successful in treating pain and many acute and chronic conditions, such as. . .

  • Arthritis
  • Degenerative Joint Disease
  • Tendonitis
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Sprains, Strains & Fractures
  • Post-Surgical Healing / Pain Relief
  • Tooth Extraction Pain Relief
  • Periodontal Disease
  • Inflammations
  • Allergies
  • Infections
  • Cuts/ Bites
  • Chronic Conditions
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Lick Granulomas
  • Geriatric Care
  • Feline Acne

Now, this technology is available right here, at Good Hope Animal Hospital. . .

Cold Laser Therapy

First recognized for its beneficial effects almost 40 years ago, there have been thousands of studies documenting the positive effects of laser light on different types of cells, tissues, and disorders.

How does it work? This brief video explains the science behind the therapy. . .

 

 

As you can see, the laser light promotes better blood flow and stimulates the production of ATP deep in the tissue of treated areas. Not only is the procedure completely safe, but oftentimes pets will relax during the treatment as though they’re being massaged. In fact, occasionally, angry cats will begin to purr and dogs will fall asleep during their session.

While the above video contains a lot of medical jargon, Dr. Jim Humphries of the Veterinary News Network provides a down-to-earth explanation of Cold Laser Therapy. Please watch. . .

 

Treatments

As with any medical or therapeutic procedure, treatment plans are prescribed based on your pet’s specific condition. Therefore, the number and length of treatments varies from animal to animal and situation to situation. In most cases, several treatments are required for maximum efficacy.

Could Cold Laser Therapy help your pet? What kind of treatment plan might they need? Call us. We’ll happily discuss your situation and present your options.

An Investment In Your Pet

Naturally, new and innovative medical technology can be costly. And you might expect that an advanced procedure like Cold Laser Therapy could cost patients hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. And even at that price, wouldn’t it be worth it to see your pet healthier, happier, and more active?

Fortunately, Cold Laser Therapy has become very economical. In fact. . .

Currently, we are offering a package of 6 treatments for just $120. That’s only $20 per treatment!

But that’s not the full story. For a very limited time, we’re offering a $30 Gift Certificate that you can use toward the purchase of your treatment package. That means that your pet will receive 6 full treatments for a mere $90.

 

That’s only $15 per treatment!!!

 

Don’t let this offer get away from you. This $30 Gift Certificate will expire on September 27, 2013. You can take advantage of it now by clicking on and printing the certificate below. Then, just call or email our office to schedule your first treatment.

 
Cold Laser Therapy Gift Certificate
 

CALL NOW to Schedule Your First Treatment!

717-766-5535


 

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Therapy Laser Treatments

Written by Heather Sinn, Office Manager

 

If you have been noticing your furry friend starting to slow down, or showing signs of limping, not going up the stairs as easily, or having trouble getting around in general, we have something that may help them feel young again. We are pleased to announce that we have a Companion Therapy Laser. This proven technology has been something available to aid us humans in our recovery and rehabilitation processes for many years, and now it has been adapted for and is available to our pets as well.

The Therapy Laser works by sending rejuvenating and healing beams of light deep into the tissue to increase blood flow and circulation, and it works by stimulating the immune system and accelerating tissue repair and cell growth. Dogs and Cats that suffer from arthritis, back or limb pain, hot spots or other skin conditions, wounds of a vast variety, or just the overall effects of getting older are prime candidates to receive this wonderfully helpful treatment.

We offer our Therapy Laser treatments in multi-treatment packages or on an individual treatment basis – depending on the pet’s needs and situation. The results that we have seen here ourselves with the progress and improvement of the pets that we have used the therapy laser on have been absolutely remarkable.

To find out if Therapy Laser treatments could be a right for your dog or cat, give our office a call to schedule a visit with one of our highly skilled veterinarians. Our doctors will be glad to fully evaluate your pet’s condition and health to see if they would benefit from some Therapy Laser treatments. We look forward to hearing from you, and putting that spring back in your pet’s step.

 

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Flea & Tick Free is the Way to Be!

Written by Heather Sinn, Office Manager

 

The weather will soon be getting warmer and with spring just around the corner, be sure to have your pets protected against fleas and ticks. Not only is it important to treat your dogs who go outside to relieve themselves and to go on those long awaited walks around the neighborhood, but it is equally crucial to treat your cats who stay indoors all year round. If you’re like most multi-species pet owners, we all think of treating the dog, since they will be outside a lot, and around other dogs at the dog park, but many pet owners don’t always remember to treat the cat who spends their day lounging inside and soaking up the sun from their favorite window perch. Even if the cat never sets a paw outdoors, they are still at great risk of being a walking buffet for hundreds of hungry fleas.

If you have ever had a flea infestation in your home, you know that they don’t just affect your pets, but they affect your entire household, including your family. The best way to protect your pets and your home is to use a good monthly flea and tick preventative such as Frontline Plus. If you apply the treatment regularly every month, your pets will be able to go outside to play, take long walks through the woods, and come home confident that they are protected against those pesky little critters that we all cringe to think about. Fleas and ticks are not uncommon, and your pets are able to pick them up just by walking by a raccoon’s favorite hideout, or exploring the tall grasses or wooded areas, so please don’t think you’re doing anything wrong.

Do an at home evaluation of your pet – part the hair and look closely at their skin…if you see little black specks, this is the telltale sign that they have fleas, as these little black dots are flea feces. Also comb through their fur with a flea comb to check for live fleas – they love to hide on their underside and around their inner hind legs. To inspect your home, look in their pet beds and favorite sleeping spots to check for flea dirt or even live fleas. If you notice evidence of fleas or an infestation, give our office a call for some advice on how to manage the situation.

After your dogs has been outside for their afternoon walk, or out playing with the neighborhood dogs, we recommend you take a good look for any ticks on their fur and skin when they come back indoors. Early tick removal is a great way to prevent or minimize the transmission of disease. If you find a tick feeding on your pet, the first thing to do is… don’t panic. Then remove the tick by firmly grasping it as close to your pet’s skin as you can and gently pull up on the tick with one continuous twisting motion to pull it out, making sure you get the entire tick out, including the head. It is a good idea to use a pair of tweezers to get a hold of the tick, but be careful not to squeeze too hard. After removing a tick from your pet, keep an eye on the area where you removed it, and be sure to call us at the first sign of any infection, or if you notice a change in your pet’s behavior.

 

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Allergic Pododermatitis

Written by Dr. Nina Mantione

 

The warmer months bring lazy days in the sun, trips to the beach, and the incessant lick, lick, lick of a dog with itchy feet. Sound familiar? Because anyone who has ever lived with a dog that has an allergic pododermatitis will attest that this constant licking will drive the dog and his family crazy.

Pododermatitis is a typically itchy inflammation of the feet which is generally secondary to allergies. I did say we see it in the warmer months, but there are plenty of dogs who will have symptoms all year round, depending on the type of allergy they have and their geographical location. And not to be left out, cats can actually get this condition too, but it is far more common in their canine friends.

Pododermatitis can occur in all of the feet at once or in just some of the feet. Affected dogs will lick, sometimes almost constantly, at their itchy paws, and begin to create a never ending cycle of irritation and inflammation.

Affected paws will almost always be moist (from all of that licking) and red. Often I will see the telltale sign of salivary staining in light colored dogs, which is a pinkish discoloration of the fur surrounding the area they have been licking at. Dogs with more severe pododermatitis can have swollen painful feet and will often come into my office limping on their offending paws. On my physical exam, I will usually find inflammation, redness and sometimes even ulcerated areas between their toes and on the bottoms of their feet. This is caused by the inflammation that occurs secondary to the allergies as well as the trauma caused by the constant licking. All of that licking also causes a chronic wetness between the toes, which creates a very cozy habitat for bacteria and yeast to thrive.

Treatment of pododermatitis involves treating those inflamed itchy feet, but most importantly it involves managing those underlying allergies. For the affected feet, I will often prescribe antibiotics or antifungals depending on whether or not I suspect a bacterial and/or yeast infection. I will control that itchy inflammation with steroids, either topical and/or oral depending on the severity of the problem. Keeping the feet, all four of them, clean and dry will also go a long way to prevent recurrences. Although it is a lot of work, washing those allergy prone paws on a daily basis is helpful to remove any allergens that can sit on the skin and cause problems.

Allergy management is the same as that for other pet allergic conditions, and involves avoiding any known triggers, the use of steroids and antihistamines, as well as the possible use of immunomodulating medications, skin testing and even allergy shots.

If you think your pet has a pododermatitis, see your veterinarian as soon as possible to help improve and control those itchy paws!

 

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Pet Safety while at Good Hope Animal Hospital

A Message from the Owners: Dr. Rob & Jeni Heidecker

In a constant effort to continue to raise our standards and improve our quality of care, we must ask for your help with the following:

All pets must be leashed or placed in an appropriate carrier while on GHAH premises (including parking lot).

It is never ideal to carry an unleashed pet(s) in your arms when not within the safety of your home/property.

More often than not, our patients are extremely excited to see us! Tails start a-waggin and butts start a-wigglin. However, some patients are not as thrilled to visit us. They may be new to us, may not be feeling well, or they just may not love going to the doctors’. Pets can become frightened and anxious easily with barking, meowing, activity, etc. If not properly restrained, they could get loose in the office injure themselves, injure another pet, or get injured by another pet. GHAH and all of our team members take the safety of your pet(s), the safety of you, and the safety of ourselves very seriously. Also, if you know your dog does not do well in this type of setting or has problems with aggression around other animals, or anything else you think we should know, please call us ahead of time and we can make special arrangements to accommodate you or take your pet to an area that they feel more comfortable in.

Please address these issues, concerns, questions, or comments with our front office team. (717)766-5535 opt 2. Remember, a happy, healthy, safe pet, is the BEST pet. (P.S. – Don’t forget about our parking lot too. Have you seen how fast some folks drive?)

 

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Valentine’s Day Hazards

Written by Dr. Robert Heidecker
 

Tips To Keep Your Pet Safe – We Love Your Pet Too

Valentine’s Day can present many dangers for pets with certain foods, flowers and other items that need to be kept out of paws’ reach. Don’t leave these goodies out for your pets to get into. Poison control experts see many cases per year and especially see a rise in certain cases of poisonous plants and food items being ingested around Valentine’s Day each year. Many of these cases involve certain flowers such as lilies (that can be potentially fatal to cats) and chocolates.

Below is a list of things to make sure you keep out of your pet’s reach over Valentine’s Day or any time throughout the year:

Chocolates

Baker’s, semi-sweet, milk and dark chocolate. Dark chocolates are the worst and can affect gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiac function with pets that ingest these chocolates presenting with vomiting/diarrhea, hyperactivity, abnormally elevated heart rate, and seizures. The lighter chocolates can cause pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas).While it is okay for us humans to indulge a bit on Valentine’s Day, please keep ALL chocolates out of the reach of your pet’s paws.

Sweeteners/Xylitol

Do not let pets near food items sweetened with xylitol. Gum, candies and other foods that are sweetened with this ingredient can cause a pet to have hypoglycemia, or a sudden drop in their blood sugar. This can cause your pet to experience depression, seizures, or loss of coordination.

Alcohol

Animals can suffer severe adverse reactions from ingesting even small amounts of alcohol. Keep alcohol and alcoholic beverages away from pets and be sure to clean up spills of alcoholic beverages before your pet has the chance to lap it up. If a pet does ingest alcohol or alcohol-containing beverages the symptoms could include: vomiting, diarrhea, loss of coordination, central nervous system depression, tremors, difficulty breathing, metabolic disturbances, and even coma. Respiratory failure could also occur if enough alcohol is ingested.

Thorny Plants

Roses or plants that have thorny or sharp stems can cause punctures or tears to your pets mouth, muzzle, tongue, face, throat, esophagus, etc. if bitten or chewed/swallowed. Keep all thorny plants up high and out of your pet’s reach or de-thorn/stem these plants to avoid a potential injury or trip to the vet.

Bouquets/Flowers

All species of the lily are potentially fatal to cats. Be sure when ordering a bouquet that you specify no lily’s if the recipient is a cat owner. If you receive a bouquet of flowers, make sure you go through the flowers and remove all dangerous plants or flora. If you notice your pet is displaying symptoms of stomach upset, vomiting/diarrhea, etc. he may have ingested one of these dangerous plants. You can use online toxic and non-toxic plant libraries to identify what should and should not be in your bouquets. As always, call your veterinarian immediately should you suspect your pet has ingested a toxic plant material.

Candles and fire

Candles are certainly romantic and can “set the mood” but our pets do not understand this. It is best to keep candles up high and out of reach of inquisitive pets. Many companies are making very good flameless candles and tea light candles that are much safer and can help us avoid unnecessary injuries to our curious four-legged friends. Pets can burn their very sensitive noses and whiskers by investigating a flickering flame and cats have unintentionally knocked candles over setting fire to both their tails and household items or even people’s homes. Please be very, very careful and use extreme caution when lighting candles when your pets are around.

Ribbons/Wrapping Goods

Keep tapes, ribbons, bows, wrapping papers, balloons, cellophane goods, etc. out of reach of your pets. These items are fun for your pet to chew or eat and can cause serious problems for your pet, sometimes even life-threatening. String or ribbon can get twisted in your pet’s digestive tract and cause an obstruction, in which you pet could need life-saving surgery. Other wrapping goods can get lodged in your pet’s throat causing them to choke or vomit.

**As always, consult our office or your personal veterinarian immediately should you feel that your pet has ingested any of the above listed items. A phone call only takes a moment and it can never hurt to be sure when it comes to the life and well-being of your pet! A happy, healthy, SAFE pet is the best kind of pet to have!     That is what we at GHAH are here for!!!!!     (717)766-5535.